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INTERVIEW: Nadia Nakai Dishes On ‘Nadia Naked’

On her first album, BRAGGA strips down more layers to reveal the version of herself you hadn’t met.

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Nadia Nakai fesses up to being both excited and nervous about the looming premiere of her long awaited debut album, Nadia Naked.

Debuting on Friday, June 28th, the long awaited LP is arguably the most anticipated South African Hip Hop album in 2019. It’s not hard to understand why, though. Fans have protested the absence of a Nadia Nakai album on the shelves for eons now.

“I’m probably the hardest working rapper in South Africa, period.”

it’s all thanks to an impressive catalogue of bops that the demand for a full body of work has been mounting for years for Nadia.

The constant pressure to release an album has inspired, she tells us, the sonic quality and authentic substance of the project. “They are going to hear the growth I’ve gone through as an artist”, she says, explaining how the album reveals layers of her soul.

Nadia Naked marks a definitive era. It’s one, Nadia says, that will set a few records straight about the position she takes up in the imagination of music audiences in South Africa and beyond.

She works damn hard, for one, and a lot of people can’t get past certain preconceived notions. “People think I get a lot of stuff because I’m associated with Cassper, or because I’m part of Family Tree and I’m just a pretty face who looks cute in bum shorts.”

At the heart of it, Nadia Naked introduces a version of Nadia as told through her own pen, her own terms and, most importantly, her own truth. She distills the journey and chats all things debut album in a conversation with QuenchSA.


Your debut album Nadia Naked is coming out in a week. How are you feeling during the countdown to the premiere?

“I’m very nervous! (Laughs) I’ve been so anxious for this day because people have beeeen asking me when I’m releasing the album. Now it’s here, and I’m scared, nervous and excited at the same time. I’ve worked very hard on this album. I know it’s good. I’ve put in a lot work and promo behind it and I’m excited for my fans to hear the work.

There are so many expectations for this one because fans have been on your case about dropping it…

The one thing that I had to not focus on was the constant pressure for me to release an album. It’s because of that pressure that I’ve had to keep going back to the label and be like, ‘the album’s done! Let’s release it, it’s done!’

And they’ll be like ‘no, it’s not.’ It’s the most frustrating thing when people keep saying the album is not done yet and you need to get back in the studio and record more new music. But if it wasn’t for the pressure from the fans, I don’t think I would have gotten to this stage in terms of how good the album is now.

I’m so excited because what they’ve been asking for is finally here. My fans are going to hear the work that I’ve put into the album. They are going to hear the growth I’ve gone through as an artist, more so when you listen to the album, compared to anything else I’ve done.

Why the title Nadia Naked?

The title Nadia Naked plays on my name, Nadia Nakai. And, I’m not sure if you are aware but, every time I perform, people always say I never have any clothes on. ‘Nadia is naked! Nadia is always naked!’

It’s also about stripping away the layers that I’ve created for myself to not allow people in. If something happens, I never address it on social media and I’m aware that many people want to know how I felt about certain things…

So I speak about my family, my relationships with people in the music industry. I speak about break ups and my emotional states. I’m allowing people into my life to get to know Nadia, naked.

Having performed for massive crowds and dabbled in other successful ventures within show business, are there any other situations that still make you nervous at all?

Everything! Everything makes me nervous. Before I get on stage, I’m extremely nervous. When I’m about to do a photoshoot, I’m nervous because I always want to make sure it’s different from anything you’ve seen in Africa. I think I’m in a constant state of anxiety! (laughs)

Wow! We’d never be able tell. You always command the stage with so much confidence. When does the switch happen, then? 

The switch is when I actually get on stage. When you get there and you see people get excited, see them sing along to your songs and lose their minds. I don’t think there’s anyone who doesn’t get nervous before getting onstage.

Nadia Naked is arguably the most anticipated Hip Hop album in a long time. What can fans expect?

Fans can expect really good music, for one. It’s a rap album. I’m not doing a trap vibe. I’m going back to where I started, rap. Telling stories. People can expect a really good first album. A lot of people will be very shocked when they hear the album because they have certain expectations of what to expect from a Nadia album…

Talking of preconceived notions, what’s the biggest misconception about you?

I think the biggest misconception about me is that I’m not a hard worker. People think I get a lot of stuff because I’m associated with Cassper, or because I’m part of Family Tree and I’m just a pretty face who looks cute in bum shorts. They think I get the things I get because of the way I look but that couldn’t be further from the truth.

I work extremely hard. I’m constantly on the grind and I push the shit out of anything that I’m involved in. I put my own money that I’m not even being paid, just to make sure that everything I’m involved in is amazing. Like Castle Lite last year. I spent more money than I got paid to do the show because I wanted it to be amazing. I’m probably the hardest working rapper in South Africa, period!

Which track on the album is most personal to you?

There’s a song called Kreatures with Kwesta. I’m talking about how the industry can be very dark, in the sense that people around you aren’t always gonna be happy for you. They can be ‘kreatures’!  You’ll have to listen to it to get it.

There’s another song where I speak about slavery. Every black person knows that story, it resonates. There’s also another one with Tshego, where I talk about how getting over past relationships can be so hard, to the point where you want to escape. When the pain is just too much and you want take something to numb it.

How did you decide on the collaborations?

I’ve always been a firm believer of collaborating with people you genuinely respect and have a connection with. I’m not gonna collaborate with someone just because it makes marketing or strategic sense. I met Ycee and the MTV awards. We vibed and I knew I wanted to have a song with the guy. We’ve been wanting to have a song together, and we found the perfect song.

Kwesta and I have actually worked on multiple collaborations from the days when I was signed wit Psyfo. Those songs never got released for whatever reason but I’m glad I was able to get him again for this song. Khuli Chana is someone I’ve respected for a very long time. The type of song that I got him on makes perfect sense. When I played it, I thought ‘this is definitely Khuli Chana vibes’. He murdered it.

You have a catalogue with some really big hits, a TV show, a retail clothing range, and are ambassador for Courvoisier. What has been the biggest milestone in your career?

Definitely the album!

… Your baby!!

You don’t understand! People don’t understand what it actually takes to make an album. Some artists just put songs together and say it’s an album. It ripped me apart and put me back together. I learnt so much about myself.

Nadia Naked comes out on Friday, May 28th, 2019.

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INTERVIEW: Wanda Baloyi On Finding Her Voice

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Exclusive Music Interview with South African Jazz singer Wanda Baloyi

Wanda Baloyi’s musical evolution has been a thrill to witness.

Having started out as a member of popular girl group ‘Ghetto Luv’, she quickly transitioned out of the definitive early 2000’s upbeat Kwaito era to a jazzier sound.

The songbird was raised in a musical family, a journey which was heavily influenced by her father Jaco Maria, a Cape Town singer and lead vocalist for 1980’s group Ozila. As such, it was inevitable that Wanda would sooner unleash her creative agility.

On her debut album Voices, Baloyi let go of the fierce hooks that had characterised her initial musical era, and started slowing down the tempo to showcase her beautiful vocals over delightful melodies.

Exclusive Music Interview with South African Jazz singer Wanda Baloyi

And while that was almost two decades ago, the songstress maintains that music must be a platform for authentic storytelling. “Our people want to know about us”, she says. “They want to know what the issues we are dealing with are, our story, our language and our rhythm.”

After taking a breather and retreating from the trappings of popular culture and the zeitgeist, as it where, Wanda makes a triumphant to the spotlight with new music.

This season, which kicks off with ‘Umendo’, finds her content and assured in who she is.

“What’s new about me as an artist, and as a woman, is I’m more content about who and where I am. I’ve accepted things that I cannot change.”

Consistent with her commitment to telling stories that help others relate and find a sense of healing, ‘Umendo’ gives a voice to the blowback African women face when leaving marriages.

“It talks about a failed marriage and the expectations of the wife in the African cultural content, and the shame of having to go back home and face your family, face the community with that title of coming from a failed marriage”, she tells us.

In this interview, Wanda Baloyi reflects on the treasures of experiences that have shaped her new outlook on life, how she has found her voice, as well as how the new music aims to shine a light on parts of ourselves that yearn to be known.

Q: It’s always fascinating finding out about the frenzy that follows the release of new music for an artist…

Because I haven’t been doing it for a while, it feels a little bit new. But for me, it’s obviously just a process that you have to get through. So it’s fun and exciting to get people to know what you’ve been working on and what the project is about.

Q: Obviously it’s a different feeling from the day just before you release new work. What is that like, the emotions before releasing a new song?

It’s mixed emotions. There’s this anxious feeling because you’ve been creating this baby, you’ve been in studio doing whatever you can do to make this baby sound proper, and you are happy with it… you are excited!

But now taking it to the next step and to the audience… it’s like literally stripping yourself naked and expecting people to be like “Woah! Hot body!” (Laughs) So it’s a bit scary and exciting because before you let go, you, yourself are content and happy with it. If it starts with your happiness, the rest is not in your control.

Q: Is that possibly the scariest thing about being an artist?

There are many scary things about being an artist. Being an artist in itself is scary! Being able to release and let go of your projects to the world is scary. Being onstage is scary. Being unproductive and not being relevant in terms of being loyal to your craft, is scary because you feel God has blessed you with this talent, so why aren’t you doing anything with it?

That’s scary on its own. Just the fact that you are haunted by this gift on a daily basis is scary because it also affects your relationships and a whole lot of things. It’s a very selfish talent, by the way. It demands so much of you that whoever is with you is going to have to be with ya’ll.

There also many scary elements of the industry itself, but in that scariness its exciting and fun! There’s no day that you wake up with nothing to do… There’s a bit of both in it, and I think that in life, if you don’t do anything scary, you won’t do anything exciting.

Q: Your latest single Umendo. Tell us about the genesis of the song

First of all, I worked with a really amazing talent. Dr. Sipho Sithole who has worked with amazing artists in South Africa.

That’s on its own was an exciting collaboration.

I had given him the vision of what I wanted to do on the project, and I think because he was long ready to work with me, he was like, ‘I got you!’ From the first day when we recorded the first song, till the last, it was a breeze. It was an amazing experience. It was more fun than it was work.

I wanted the project to have meaning in terms of the messages we are talking about in the songs. I wanted it to have depth in the storytelling.

And not only stories that are personal to myself, but things we go through in society, in the continent, in the world. As a woman, as a black woman and as Africans. I wanted the issues to be topical.

In this case ‘Umendo’ talks about marriage. I’m not married by the way, not yet! (Laughs).

What I love about the topic is it talks about a failed marriage and the expectations of the wife in the African cultural content, and the shame of having to go back home and face your family, face the community with that title of coming from a failed marriage.

It’s about having to take your children back and having to explain. The whole issue of it being difficult for a woman to remove herself from a situation while being judged.

It’s expected for you because ‘Hawu, you are married mos. Stay there! Hold on. Fight for it!’ But there are certain things that take so much from you that you have to free yourself. Already in the country, we are dealing with gender based violence and so many issues, that the stories are not being voiced in song.

This is a song that creates and provokes conversation. It gets people to talk about it. Someone sitting somewhere will be like, ‘yo I’m in this situation and I can get out of it.’

Q: Do you feel that in the South African music industry and the space we take up in the world, that we are telling our authentic stories?

I think we are now. I’m inspired by the new talent. They are very fearless, and decisive about what they want to say in their songs. I can make an example about Samthing Soweto and Sjava. Those artists are talking about real issues.

I think what connects them to people is the audience is that realness. Someone sitting elokshini or wherever would be like ‘uSjava ukhuluma ngami’ (Sjava is talking about me), or is talking about an issue that I can deeply relate to because this is my reality.

So I think we are. We are delving into ourselves. We have revisited our roots and gone back to the source. Our people want to know about us. They want to know what the issues we are dealing with are, our story, our language and our rhythm.

Q: People completely evolve every five years. This being the beginning of a new era for you, what is new about as a person as an artist?

What’s new about me as an artist and as a woman is I’m more content about who and where I am. I’ve accepted things that I cannot change. I’m truer to myself than I was before.

I think maturing, growing and going through experiences, trials and tribulations, puts you in a space where you become a complete package of yourself. These things are not comparable to anyone else. It’s a personal space where you find contentment and fulfilment with yourself.

And I must say, I’ve become a little more spiritual and I think that brings you there. The world can be so hectic. The world can easily lead you astray if you don’t have a sense of focus and coming back to your sanity and alignment. For me it’s prayer, it’s my mom. She is a constant reminder of what I can become. Also, it’s okay for you to express yourself and tell your stories in a manner that is comfortable for you.

Q: What inspires you, ultimately?

Life. I’m inspired by life, I’m inspired by truth and I’m inspired by many things! I love coming back to my experiences, and that’s my truth. I’m inspired by pain because I relate to it, I recognise it, I’m familiar with it. That can be a little bit good, because it forces you to come out of it.

Pain in the same way as depression is a reminder of where you aren’t supposed to be, or what you don’t want. So when you feel that, go in. It’s healing, when you face your pain. I’m also inspired by people in general, by other musicians

Q: You grew up in a musical family. What was that moment for you when you knew music is certainly what you want to do?

Yes, I’m from a musical family. My dad is a musician, he’s an amazing vocalist.  I think growing up in a musical family, I didn’t really know I was going to be a musician. It’s just something that was there. I was surrounded by it. I loved it and there was always some time of excitement.

As I grew older, I started to find my voice and passion and I was like, ‘This space makes me happy.’ But it wasn’t something where I sat down and decided, ‘Oh, I’m going to do this’. It just captured me.

Q: What’s been the most definitive moment in your career so far?

The realisation that I can not live without it. In whatever shape or form.

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INTERVIEW: Mafikizolo Talks Staying Power, Milestones And New Single

The iconic duo can’t stress enough the importance of respecting one’s craft.

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Mafikizolo
Photo Credit: Supplied

Back in 2015 on the Boomtown stage at the Durban July, I had the privilege of experiencing first hand the magic that informs the staying power that has sustained Mafikizolo’s chart dominance since they first entered the music scene, with their bhujwa swag, in the late 90’s.

Midway through the performance of their #1 hit Khona, Nhlanhla’s shoelaces started coming off, threatening to set in motion a devastating series of events that would have seen her take a tumble and plunge into the crowd.

Instead, what happened next would become a watershed moment that can school any formation about the power of authentic synergy. Theo quickly went down on his knees to tighten the shoelaces without disrupting the flow of their energetic delivery.

South African Music News: Mafikizolo Interview

Mafikizolo return to their roots in 2019 single, ‘Ngeke Balunge’. Photo Credit: Supplied

All this was done without missing a beat.

It’s this laser sharp focus and a display of teamwork that would see one of South Africa’s best selling music acts of all time cultivate not only a discography like no other, but also the rare ability to stay relevant for more than two decades.

“We don’t want to limit ourselves based on our past victories.”

And while we are sure the iconic duo, consisting of Nhlanhla Nciza and Theo Kgosinkwe, can publish several books detailing the trade secrets that have given them more than nine lives, humility and maintaining respect for one’s craft are the keys behind Mafikizolo’s success.

“We never feel like we’ve arrived”, says Nhlanhla, despite the duo’s global success, which includes their work being displayed at Grammy Museum alongside the likes of Micheal Jackson, Elton John and Elvis Presley.

South African Music News: Mafikizolo 2019 Interview

Mafikizolo makes a triumphant return to the scene with new single, ‘Ngeke Balunge’

Despite the unprecedented milestones, their blockbuster catalogue and their status as one of Africa’s most celebrated living legends, Mafikizolo are plotting their next move. We caught up with the duo as they distilled their 22 years of unleashing street anthems while influencing the soundscape through their multiple reinventions.

Congrats on the new single, ‘Ngeke Balunge’. How did the song come about?

Theo: We collaborated with Mondli Ngcobo on this track. He produced it. I think it’s because we’ve always had a relationship with him. He’s always wanted to write something for us a long time ago. I guess he’s always wanted to write that one particular song.

He’s always said, “I want to work with you guys but I want to write that perfect song for you.” So I think the timing is perfect. He’s actually got two songs for us. He came to Joburg and presented the two songs. We recorded the songs and we chose this one as the first single. That’s how it all came about. I think it’s because he’s been following Mafikizolo for a long time. He’s been our fan and we’ve been fans of his work.

From the songs, how did you decide on this one to be the first single?

Nhlanhla: Well, we knew definitely that we wanted to go back to our original sound. We missed the days of Emlanjeni, Mas’thokoze, Ubahlula Bonke… you know? The days of ballads. I mean, we know and understand that there’s Gqom, there’s House and Amapiano that have taken over. Still, we wanted something that will be different from what everyone else is doing. We loved the two tracks that he presented to us but the first single is the one that blew everyone away. It blew us away!

What’s funny is that the track – because every time I get a track I would just go around and play for people – I played the two tracks to see which one they loved the most. And funny enough, even the younger people… because we thought we are targeting the older audience, but even the younger people are crazy about the song. So it was really easy for us to decide.

Real talk, it’s such a beautiful song…

Theo: Indeed! And just adding on Nhlanhla and what she was saying. You know, when Khona came out… there’s something about the song that you don’t know what it is about it that makes people move. It’s a spiritual thing because you don’t know what it is about the song that moves you so much… you can’t figure it out. Because, I thought when we were busy posting the song, I thought ‘Ah this is an urban Zulu song.’ And then you get people from Zambia, Nigeria, Zimbabwe singing and posting the song! They love the song. They might not understand it, but they love it. They’ve been saying, ‘What a spiritual song!’

Nhlanhla: Even South Africans are like, ‘thing song does somethings to me, emotionally. I get so emotional and sometimes I wanna cry when I listen to the song.’ That was not even our intention, we just wanted to do a love song. Some people don’t even know that it’s actually a love song. They are thinking it’s like… impi (war).

Theo: Let me add to this. If they don’t miss out on this, this song could be a perfect song for Amabhokobhoko (The Springboks). It’s a perfect victory song for them because they can say… (sings) ’Abadede impela, kufike izingwazi’. It’s got that chant!

So if you had to choose a perfect song that is relevant for the victory that we brought as South Africa and Amabhokobhoko. It might be a love song, but it’s one that unites. (Breaks into song again) Angeke bas’xelele abayeke umona. It unites and at the same time it’s about love and celebration. I’m punting the song to be the official theme. If anyone is looking for a song to celebrate Amabhokobhoko, this is the song!

Nhlanhla: Or any victory! Even you as a person. You can say, I’m trying do this and there are people around me who are not rooting for me and are negative towards what I’m trying to do. You are saying ‘Ngeke balunge’, you know? Ngeke bangiqede. Abadede! Its a victory song more than anything

With the victory theme, I got a sense that the song paid homage to how resilient Mafikizolo has been. As people who’ve worked together for so long, how have you managed to continue working together well for this long?

Theo: I think the dream of success never really died. We don’t want to limit ourselves based on our past victories because there are new challenges to be won and new goals to be reached. We keep reinventing ourselves and wanting to work with different producers who can bring a different sound. On our previous album, we worked with DJ Maphorisa. This time around we were blessed to work with Mondli Ngcobo and as we plan for our album next year, we plan to work with other emerging producers and songwriters. We love reinventing ourselves.

For us to have this staying power, it’s because we love reinvention. We always challenge ourselves and be like, ‘What can we come with that can be new without losing ourselves?’ Even though it might be a new sound to our fans, but we don’t lose our core as Mafikizolo. Like I said, there are a lot of challenges. We still have victories to win. We want to conquer Africa, we want to conquer Europe and the world.

Nhlanhla: Also being open to learning. Always! We never feel like we’ve arrived. We’ve never, even when we’ve had some of the biggest songs previously. We are always open to learning to better ourselves and our sound, which is the most important thing. Also, when I quote the Bible, God says, ‘Lift yourself up and I shall humble you. Humble yourself and I should lift you up.’ I think for a younger person it may like ‘Oh, abantu abadala.’ But it really goes a long way – being humble, respecting your craft and respecting fans, and yourself, and remaining humble no matter what you become.

It is a distinct sound… There’s that Mafikizolo element, but it certainly sounds elevated. Does this now inform the sound of the new era, with the new album coming out next year?

Theo: We never really want to box ourselves around a particular sound and it’s always been like that from day one. Since we started recording with Kalawa in 1997, we’ve never said, like ‘Okay now, we are doing a love ballad album and we are staying there.’ Or ‘Now, we are doing Afro Pop.’ Like, we gooi! If it sounds good and it’s not totally opposite our sound…

Nhlanhla: Yeah, I mean we are a Pop band so we are very much opening to trying new things and experimenting with new sounds. I think also with this particular song, when we heard it, the influences were many, you know? We’ve always been influenced by musicians from earlier days. Like your Mam’ Letta (Letta Mbuli) and Tat’u Caiphus Semenya and Mama Miriam Makeba. We were always inspired by them.  When you listen to Chicco… the Dalom Kids…

You can actually pick these influences that we grew up listening to, but also the old Mafikizolo. So I think it was perfect because we love old songs. But like Theo said, we really  love experimenting with new sounds. Even when we heard this song, yes, it has that Mafikizolo touch but there’s something in there we’ve never done before. So we went ahead and did it.

Already, we’ve worked on other songs, which you will get to know about next year, along with the people we’ve worked with. It’s things we’ve never done and people you’d never think we would get to work with. It’s always interesting and it’s a part of reinvention.

What do young artists need to know about staying power?

Theo: I’ll go back to what Nhlanhla said before, and what we always uphold. It’s humility and respect. Humility becomes before honour. We always feel like even if you are a superstar, stay humble. Stay humble and God will lift you up. Don’t let your fame change you. It can be a confusing thing because you’ve just arrived, and you are singing everywhere. People who were never your friends are now your friends. You are getting money you never got. Sadly, the record companies don’t tell you these things. They don’t tell you that you will be famous and have a lot of money, and then these things will start happening to you… save your money, don’t act this way.

They are just excited that you are successful. And then, because no one ever sat you down, spoke to you or coached you about fame, you tend to have the ego thing. You don’t wanna take pictures with people anymore, you don’t respect your craft onstage, you don’t do interviews or you arrive late for them. It can change you and it can be a confusing stage for you. We always say, remain humble, stay passionate about your work. That’s the most important thing, which we always emphasise. Being humble will keep you for a very long time.

What have been the biggest milestone for Mafikizolo so far?

Nhlanhla (Laughs) Yoh! (To Theo…) Do you wanna start? There’s just so, so, so that much has happened. So many bad things have happened as well. Honestly, I can’t just think of one…

Theo: Yes, there’s a few. I think it’s an honour always to perform for people who are in higher places. Like when you have to go and perform for a President, and the President stands up and dances to your song… You feel like ‘wow, we are in the presence of honour’. For us to perform for the 46664 back in the days of our late President, Nelson Mandela… To meet him officially. Not only did we perform in South Africa but we also performed in Norway for him.

And I think for Nhlanhla – the highlight that she might not remember – was when she was dancing with the President of Uganda. Presidents are always stiff (laughs) but… for the first time! People were like, ‘how did you manage to dance with the President!?’ We’ve performed for Presidents… we’ve done the Davos Economic Forum, where all the leaders of the world were there and we had to perform. We had to perform ‘Ndihamba Nawe’.

I remember Mama Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma was also there. They were very proud. They stood up and danced. Other Presidents… from Germany, ambassadors. Everyone stood up and dance. We’ve performed for royalty and we’ve travelled the world. For us it’s been an honour. We’ve shared stages with big international artists. Our work was displayed at the Grammy Museum. The way that we dress and our music was featured next to your Micheal Jacksons, your Elton Johns and your Elvis Presley.

It’s some of the things that our South African people might not know about, but we feel very honoured by the opportunity that God has blessed us with, to be able to touch so many people. When we travel, we have sold out shows. We are like ‘Wow! We are in Canada, sold out! We are in Australia, sold out!’ We have achieved a lot and we feel there’s a lot that still needs to be achieved.

What can fans expect from the upcoming album?

Theo: It’s going to be a beautiful album. I’m glad that we’ve grabbed the attention of our fans who’ve been fans from Emlanjeni. The more mature audience might have felt like we’ve probably lost them, and we thought we probably thought we lost them. They might be like, ‘Hawu, where are they!?” We thought they are gone, but they haven’t left. Even when we released Khona, they were still there. We’ve realised that every time we do a show, most fans who come have been there since the Lotto days.  They are very loyal and excited about this single. We promise them beautiful love songs.

The younger audience who has just joined us… we promise them a very versatile album. It’s all about love! We celebrate love all the time! There will be dance tracks, there will be Afro Pop and love ballads on the album. It’s the same Mafikizolo, but on another level.

Ngeke Balunge is out now! Stream it here

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INTERVIEW: Prince Kaybee Talks EMAs, World Domination and Retiring In Flip Flops

In this exclusive interview, the 30 year old house music dab hands reveals how discipline and a killer work ethic are behind his success.

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Prince Kaybee exclusive Interview 2019
Photo Credit: Supplied

Some want to retire with a crown. When Prince Kaybee retires, though, he envisions himself with a cigar, whiskey and flip flops. But until then, “it’s crunch time!”

It’s for this reason that he believes people spend too much time busking in the light of their short lived glories, instead of plotting their next move. Rather than waste time amplifying his own milestones, the award winning producer has spent as much time as possible in the studio, where he engineers his sprawling catalogue.

That’s how he’s been at the top for more than five years.

Yet despite churning out a slew of blockbuster street anthems, he still ducks being dubbed an industry leader. “I still have a lot of work to do”, he says, masterminding his looming adventure into the global music market, where he intends to deliver his sound to new audiences.

The plan to conquer the world informs the creative genesis for his recently released Crossover EP, the official manifesto for his campaign to soar to new dimensions.

The house music architect had a clear plan, along with a milkshake in his hands, when we met with him to unpack his new chapter.

Congratulations on your EMA nomination for ‘Best African Act’. How does it feel to be recognised at that level?

It feels great and it’s been a long time coming, you know? It is great for the culture. I feel like I have a responsibility and an EMA is not an individual thing, it’s a South African thing.  Even with the Nasty C nomination, I feel like I have won because that is another platform where we need to represent African music. So it feels great because I look at myself in the mirror and be like, ‘yes we did it!’ But looking at the bigger picture… it’s all about Africa and what we are doing to win.

What does it mean for you to be an African artist in 2019?

It means a lot because we have been through a lot and we have seen people come and go. The past two years have been the most competitive. Looking at what is going on, like music is improving so much so that it is no longer about having one hit song in an album and all the other fifteen be wack.

People actually put in a lot of effort with the whole body of work. Like, you literally sit in and listen to an album and just drive… it’s no longer about just one hit. To answer your question, it feels great because everyone is putting in the work. You feel worthy of something that is part of the collective, or industry peers, that lead the industry.

With people coming in, blowing up, and some disappearing just as quick, how do you maintain the momentum and keep growing?

I don’t understand why artist are at the club all the time. I don’t understand why 90% of the time you are doing things that are not aligned with music when you are an artist, you know? Take a doctor for example. Would you wanna hire a wack doctor? This is your health! You would hire someone who is qualified for that, right? So what do these people do to be qualified?

It’s what they do they in the office from nine to five. I have a schedule as a musician; I have a nine to five. I get at the studio at nine in the morning and leave at 5pm. You won’t find me in the studio after that, except only when I have juicy stuff flowing. But I know my times and I know I have to be there every day. Some artists get in the studio on Monday and they literally leave and come back two months later.

For you to be consistent you actually have to work on your art constantly and give it attention. That’s the only way to do it and that is it. You can read the most expensive book on how to sustain yourself and whatever, but you have to go back to the basic rule of putting in the work because what you put in is what you get out.

Let’s talk about the transition from Re Mmino to The Cross Over EP. You have said that this EP represents a ‘new you’. Who is he and how does he differ from the old Kaybee?

It’s not necessarily a new image, new me or whatever, it is just a crossover of the genre within the genres. I’m doing something different… something outside the norm.

How do you select your collaborators?

Talent is talent, there is no two ways about it. If you work, I will tell you if you are good, let’s work. Why not? If your energy is great… and if you are positive and have certain morals in understanding the principles that I agree with, let’s work. Overall it’s talent but the energy is very important because the studio is a happy place.

This EP aligns with your intentions to venture into the global market. Tell us more about that goal?

As a brand that has done so much in South Africa, I feel like it is now time to say ‘cool guys let’s explore.’ Other people are fine (with keeping it local). There is nothing wrong with that, but I feel I want to cross over and the narrative is as is, crossing over and changing the sound, a bigger audience and letting the European people and that market know about our sound.

When I cross over it does not mean I am going to feature global artists only. I will be crossing over with artists from South Africa. On the EP as well, 90% of artists are South African even though the genre is different.

You’ve said you feel you have done everything to be done in South Africa. What has been your biggest milestone so far?

I don’t think I have a specific one. Like, everything has played a role in itself. I really don’t because since 2015 when I started mainstreaming, I can’t single out just one thing, you understand? Everything makes sense in its growth… it’s the people who interview us,  my family, the music ,the fans… You can’t single out shit.

Do you feel like the biggest artist in South Africa right now?

No!

Then who is?

There are a lot of guys who are doing huge things, like Sun El Musician is a good artist for me. Samthing Soweto is dope. And because I listen to a lot of House Music, I am gonna list a lot of House artists… but there are a lot of artists in the industry who literally shook everything, like Sjava, Sho Madjozi etc. A lot of industry peers are doing great. I feel I am nowhere near, I still have a lot of work to do.

In terms of your transformation, was the change in your look – the fitness and chopping off the dreadlocks – part of your bigger plan?

No, no, no! It isn’t. Remember, you cannot separate. Some people think sometimes I am Kabelo and other times I am Prince Kaybee, but there is no way of separating the two. There is no difference between the brand and the person because you just can’t bro! I feel like when I am on Twitter and type, it’s Kabelo and Prince Kaybee typing at the same time. Everything that I do is for the brand – gym, the change… It’s a reinvention. It’s an on-going challenge of bettering yourself as a person, you know?

Word! You are at top right now. What advice would you give to up and coming artists about getting there?

I don’t know the formula. If I had I would literally give it up. But there is one principle, which is, what you put in is what you get out. This applies to everyone; musicians, journalists, whatever… A lot of artists, especially the young ones that are coming up, they don’t believe in being in the studio every time. Once you have an album out you have to celebrate for six months. Bro, you don’t need to celebrate anything! The only time that celebrations come is when you retire.  When I retire I don’t give a shit where I am, I will always have my cigar because I have done my part. I will have my cigar and whiskey, in my flip flops. I won’t even wear sneakers.

But now it is crunch time bro! I don’t go out on vacations and I don’t go out not because I intend not to do that, I am having fun while working, so that I don’t feel like am straining myself. It’s crunch time. Let’s not start celebrating and blowing our own horns. When you win an award stop telling us for the next 5 years. Forget that award and win another. The young ones are too tied to little accomplishments. I always say one hit song doesn’t guarantee you a career. Look at things from that perspective.

With everything you’ve done, what is the ultimate goal you are still chasing? Say, something you will be proud of with the cigar and whiskey and flip flops?

I want to get my mom a house she has never imagined. I can afford one now but I am looking at a very homey house. Then I will be done done.

End. 

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