Album Review: Priddy Ugly’s Egypt Is A Melting Pot Of Different Influences

Priddy Ugly Egypt Album Review

The last time we caught up with Priddy Ugly over two years ago in this exclusive interview, he was diligently exploring alternative avenues for pushing his music independently.

At the time the rapper, who had just dropped a mixtape that he didn’t consider a mixtape because of the meticulous attention to detail and visual support he had given it, was really just pouring out his heart and soul into the art as an authentic and passion fueled method of cracking open doors behind which record labels and big corporates reserved all seats at the table.

As would attest any indie South African rapper, that’s no walk in the park. In fact, it’s probably closer to floating than it is to walking. Everything on the ground itself seems zoned and patented by record labels.

Priddy Ugly’s undeniable drive is probably one of many reasons behind his resilient ascension in the business. To everyone’s surprise, certainly our surprise, he got signed with Ambitiouz Entertainment earlier in the year.

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It’s a move that, more than ‘selling out’, more likely reveals his commitment to getting his music to the people. Despite its ongoing legal disputes with its former signees, the record label has pulled some solids for the likes of Amanda Black, Emtee and Sjava, all whom have succeeded in winning over the airwaves in recent years.

And after a string of commercial bangers with the record label, Egypt on Friday became his first full body of work under the music entity. Shane Eagle, Wichi, Emtee , Saudi and KLY, as well his LOML Bontle all appear as collabos on various tracks

The 15-track album distills Priddy’s journey in a multi-layered and flavoured album. He is confident in it, and really plucks the opportunity to introduce his signature sound to what will be a much bigger audience. Egypt , like the rapper himself, manages to be both multi-faceted without losing sight of elements that anchor a consistent identity.

Smogolo, Tshela and Beijtie are siblings from the same world. They are also easy-win gifts to the Afro-Trap obsessed segment of the market, who will likely be shuffling these songs with some from Emtee’s Manando. It’s the 808’s part of the album. Along with In The Mood, featuring Saudi, they find a spot in the club playlist, or around 6 PM at Pop Bottles.

And just to add: Having emerged three months ago, Tshela has considerable commercial mileage in it. Bop snaps!

The highest moments of the album, however, are when Priddy Ugly plays around a bit more with his artistry. He’s a decent lyricst: Listening to moments where he gets to play around with some cool linguistic instruments on Egypt, Ambition II and I Pray and Runaway Girl is that gentle nudge about his skill.

The production quality on those songs is clean. The lines are delivered with precision and conviction, with a lot of soul and honesty and these ethereal sounds that make for a mellow, smooth and spatial feeling.

As a result, Egypt is a smooth ride that sees Priddy Ugly straddle the best of what the current wave is offering, and his own laid back, pukka sound.


Photo Credit: Instagram/Priddy_Ugly

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